IN SEARCH OF THE SOLUTION TO FARMER–PASTORALIST CONFLICTS IN TANZANIA

             By GODFREY  ELISEUS MASSAY

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Land-use conflict is not a new phenomenon for pastoralists  and farmers in Tanzania with murders, the killing of livestock and the loss of property as  a  consequence of  this  conflict  featuring   in  the  news  for  many years  now.  Various actors,  including civil society organisations, have tried  to  address  farmer–pastoralist conflict through  mass  education programmes, land-use planning, policy reforms and  the development of community institutions. However, these efforts have not succeeded in the conflict. Elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa traditional systems are not making much headway either. This paper finds that resolving the mutual hostility between farmers and  pastoralists  is problematic because it is linked to historical evictions that happened from the colonial and  post- colonial  period  until the early  1990s. It also  points  to the limitations of Tanzania’s formal land  dispute  settlement  machinery, which  does not provide appropriate forums and  mechanisms  for resolving farmer– pastoralist   conflicts.  The paper argues that  the  existing  systems  do not favour the interests of either farmers  or pastoralists, and  calls for specific reforms.  Drawing  on the experiences of a farmer–pastoralist platform  established  by  the  Tanzania  Natural   Resource  Forum,  a local  non-governmental organisation  working  on  natural   resource governance issues,  it proposes an  alternative  mechanism  based on the popular participation of the victims in resolving such conflicts.CLICK HERE TO READ MORE

Tanzania’s Village Land Act 15 years

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By Godfrey Massay 

The year 2016 marks 15 years since the new wave land reforms became operational in Tanzania. Despite its ambitious goals – encouraging land registration and titling, and empowering women and other vulnerable groups – the results are disillusioning. A brief overview of 15 years of implementation, using the Village Land Act as a case study. In 1999, the Land Act, number 4 and the Village Land Act, number 5 were enacted to govern land administration in Tanzania. Both legislations started to be implemented in May 2001. Although numerous efforts have been made by the Government of Tanzania and other actors to implement the Village Land Act, progress has been slow and uneven, and has not moved beyond pilot projects. This brief urges that, given the insecurity that powerful interests are creating regarding the village lands, more needs to be done to increase the pace of implementation.

Engagement with Members of Parliament

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When: 
13 May 2017 -
9:00am to 4:00pm
14 May 2017 -
9:00am to 4:00pm
Location: 
Dodoma
Tanzania
TZ

DISTRICT MULTI-STAKEHOLDER FORUMS: AN UNEXHAUSTED OPPORTUNITY FOR SECURING LAND RIGHTS; THE TANZANIAN EXPERIENCE

By Masalu Luhula

Administration of land in Tanzania is more decentralized from the president to the village level. The law gives power to village councils and village assemblies to administer village land. The District authorities are given advisory and supervisory mandates over villages and represent the commissioner who takes overall administrative powers.  Despite decentralization, institutions responsible for land administration, land have continued to be cause of many conflicts for years.  Conflicts have been escalating and lead loss of lives and property. Lack of coordination among land administrative institutions has been the main route cause of land conflicts and ineffective systems of handling land conflicts administratively.

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